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By Heart & Sleep Clinics of America
April 27, 2020
Category: Heart Conditions
Tags: Heart Disease  

Heart disease is a term that refers to a range of medical conditions that negatively affect your heart. Blocked blood vessels or issues that affect your heart's valves, muscle, or rhythm all fall under the umbrella of heart disease. If you suffer from heart disease or even sleep apnea, schedule an appointment with Dr. Atif Sohail of Heart and Sleep Clinics of America. Dr. Sohail can treat your condition as well as discuss your risk factors for heart disease. Read on to learn more about how heart disease develops.

Heart Disease Factors

Your age, family history, health conditions, and lifestyle determine whether you have a higher risk of developing heart disease. While you can't control your age or family history, you can lower your risk of heart disease by changing other factors. Here's a list of factors that can cause heart disease.

Medical Conditions

Certain medical conditions make you a higher risk of developing heart disease. People with high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol can develop heart disease. Obesity is also a contributing factor.

Lifestyle

Using tobacco is another risk for heart disease. Smoking damages your blood vessels and heart. This puts you at a higher risk for a heart attack or atherosclerosis. Cigarette smoke contains carbon monoxide, which reduces the level of oxygen that your blood can transport. Nicotine also raises your blood pressure, which can lead to stroke.

Not exercising enough also contributes to heart disease. A sedentary lifestyle leads to a host of issues, including obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol.

Eating an unhealthy diet can lead to heart disease as well. Regularly consuming foods high in sodium, saturated fats, and trans fats negatively affects your body. Excess alcohol contributes to heart disease also increases your blood pressure.
 

Prioritize your Heart's Health

Learning the risk factors of heart disease can help you make the necessary lifestyle changes so that you avoid its dangers. Contact Heart & Sleep Clinics of America at 817-419-7220 to schedule your appointment.

By Heart & Sleep Clinics of America
April 23, 2020
Category: Sleep Disorders
Tags: Sleep Apnea  

Sleep apnea affects millions of Americans. While more men than women have this sleep disorder, people of both sexes and all ages can suffer from its adverse health impact. Fortunately, here at Heart & Sleep Clinics of America in Arlington, TX, Dr. Atif Sohail and his team help patients manage their sleep apnea symptoms.

What is sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea involves repeated episodes of loud snoring and breathing cessation during the night or even a daytime nap. People waken suddenly, gasp for air, and fall back to sleep. This can happen almost innumerable times a night, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

Most often, sleep apnea occurs when the tissues at the back of the throat, including the tongue, relax and block the airway. This kind of sleep apnea is known as OSA, or Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Other people may have Central Sleep Apnea, or CSA, in which the respiratory and nervous systems do not communicate well. A third kind is Mixed Sleep Apnea, which features symptoms of OSA and CSA together.

Unfortunately, sleep apnea is more than a nuisance. It harms systemic health, causing such adverse effects as heart attack, stroke, and hypertension. Other issues that appear linked to this sleep disorder are diabetes, memory problems, anxiety, depression, and more.

What are the symptoms of sleep apnea?

The most noticeable sign is loud snoring, especially if the noise is so excessive that it disturbs spouses and others in the household.

In addition, sleep apnea sufferers exhibit:

  • Daytime fatigue and sleepiness
  • Poor concentration
  • Morning headache
  • Dry mouth

Notable contributing factors are obesity and large neck circumference. However, even when these are modified, symptoms may not subside sufficiently. That's where sleep apnea treatment from Heart & Sleep Clinics of America in Arlington, TX, comes in.

Should you treat your sleep apnea?

The answer is yes, you should. Tell your primary care physician about your snoring and other symptoms. He may recommend you visit Dr. Atif Sohail for analysis of your symptoms and a home-based sleep study. Also called polysomnography, a sleep study will monitor your sleep pattern and vital signs during the night, telling the doctor if you have sleep apnea.

If you do, Dr. Sohail may advise lifestyle changes such as losing weight, limiting alcohol consumption, and sleeping on your side rather than on your back. Oral appliance therapy—also called a sleep guard—keeps the jaw in a forward position as you sleep and opens the airway.

These acrylic mouthpieces may be used singly or in conjunction with CPAP, or Continuous Positive Airway Pressure. CPAP machines deliver continuous air through a facial mask to keep the back of the throat patent.

Snore no more

At Heart & Sleep Clinics of America, cardiologist Dr. Atif Sohail and his staff solve the dangerous health condition we know as sleep apnea. For your personal consultation, please call our Arlington, TX, office at (817) 419-7220.

Sleep apnea affects millions of Americans. While more men than women have this sleep disorder, people of both sexes and all ages can suffer from its adverse health impact. Fortunately, here at Heart & Sleep Clinics of America in Arlington, TX, Dr. Atif Sohail and his team help patients manage their sleep apnea symptoms.

What is sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea involves repeated episodes of loud snoring and breathing cessation during the night or even a daytime nap. People waken suddenly, gasp for air, and fall back to sleep. This can happen almost innumerable times a night, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

Most often, sleep apnea occurs when the tissues at the back of the throat, including the tongue, relax and block the airway. This kind of sleep apnea is known as OSA, or Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Other people may have Central Sleep Apnea, or CSA, in which the respiratory and nervous systems do not communicate well. A third kind is Mixed Sleep Apnea, which features symptoms of OSA and CSA together.

Unfortunately, sleep apnea is more than a nuisance. It harms systemic health, causing such adverse effects as heart attack, stroke, and hypertension. Other issues that appear linked to this sleep disorder are diabetes, memory problems, anxiety, depression, and more.

What are the symptoms of sleep apnea?

The most noticeable sign is loud snoring, especially if the noise is so excessive that it disturbs spouses and others in the household.

In addition, sleep apnea sufferers exhibit:

  • Daytime fatigue and sleepiness
  • Poor concentration
  • Morning headache
  • Dry mouth

Notable contributing factors are obesity and large neck circumference. However, even when these are modified, symptoms may not subside sufficiently. That's where sleep apnea treatment from Heart & Sleep Clinics of America in Arlington, TX, comes in.

Should you treat your sleep apnea?

The answer is yes, you should. Tell your primary care physician about your snoring and other symptoms. He may recommend you visit Dr. Atif Sohail for analysis of your symptoms and a home-based sleep study. Also called polysomnography, a sleep study will monitor your sleep pattern and vital signs during the night, telling the doctor if you have sleep apnea.

If you do, Dr. Sohail may advise lifestyle changes such as losing weight, limiting alcohol consumption, and sleeping on your side rather than on your back. Oral appliance therapy—also called a sleep guard—keeps the jaw in a forward position as you sleep and opens the airway.

These acrylic mouthpieces may be used singly or in conjunction with CPAP, or Continuous Positive Airway Pressure. CPAP machines deliver continuous air through a facial mask to keep the back of the throat patent.

Snore no more

At Heart & Sleep Clinics of America, cardiologist Dr. Atif Sohail and his staff solve the dangerous health condition we know as sleep apnea. For your personal consultation, please call our Arlington, TX, office at (817) 419-7270.





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